Nasty, Brutish & Short

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Too much information, left on the printer tray

October 17, 2007 02:48 PM

It's an email from a paralegal to the receptionist, announcing that she's leaving early today to go to an urgent care center.  She has a urinary tract infection, and her regular doctor can't see her until tomorrow!

Why would you email that to a colleague, and then leave a copy of it on the printer?

Comments

At least it didn't say something like "I have to leave early today to go to my gynecologist. I took that at home test and it looked like a plus sign, but I want to get the confirmation before you have to tell your wife."

Ur Baby Momma   ·  October 18, 2007 10:41 AM

A neologism needs to be invented for office knowledge gathered via printer-tray.

After all, it's a perfectly cromulent way to learn what's happening with your organization and the folks who work there.

Brendan   ·  October 18, 2007 04:18 PM

My favorite was a male coworker whose female secretary was printing copious amounts of info about sexual harassment. Made for a lot of awkwardness.

Anonamiss   ·  October 18, 2007 06:24 PM

"A neologism needs to be invented for office knowledge gathered via printer-tray.

After all, it's a perfectly cromulent way to learn what's happening with your organization and the folks who work there."

"neologism", "cromulent"-- Was this intended to be funny? If not you are terrible.

Wow!   ·  October 18, 2007 08:16 PM

Brendan, not many people teach me words I don't know. Not many at all. Impressive!

Nasty, Brutish & Short   ·  October 18, 2007 09:50 PM

'Neologism' is a word.

'Cromulent' isn't. It was invented by the writers of 'The Simpsons'. In one episode they are looking at a statue of Jedidiah Springfield, and underneath there's an inscription - "Hard work embiggens the spirit." Marge Simpson says "I don't think 'embiggens' is a word." To which someone replies, "Why, it's a perfectly cromulent word!"

So, to make the joke unfunny by explaining it, it's a reflexive joke about what makes for proper language. And, triple irony, 'cromulent' has actually entered the vernacular in the years since that episode aired.

Check Google and/or Wikipedia.


Brendan   ·  October 19, 2007 08:04 AM

Jokes are a lot like frogs--they both can be dissected, but they tend to die during the process.

T.H. White   ·  October 19, 2007 08:30 AM